On Dec. 3, crowds filled the streets near the Trade & Tryon square to mark Charlotte’s 250th birthday during a celebration uptown. Attendees enjoyed music, food trucks and free cake supplied by Johnson & Wales University.

“This anniversary not only marks where we have been, it also sets the course for where we are going,” said Eugene Woods, honorary chair of CLT250 Executive Advisory Council and Atrium Heath President & CEO. “As we look ahead to the next 250 years, I know we can create a city where each individual has the opportunity to succeed and as a result, we as a community succeed.”

A highlight of the festivities was the dance moves displayed by Mayor Vi Lyles and Charlotte City Council members. Mayor Lyles said there will be lots of fun celebrating Charlotte’s milestones during the yearlong calendar of events which culminate in May.

“CLT250 is an invitation for our community to engage – collaborate, commemorate, communicate,” said City of Charlotte Mayor Vi Lyles. “I am proud to be a Charlottean and honored to work together with the people of our city to design and build a future where everyone thrives.”

Check out our list of 8 moments of Charlotte’s Black history as we celebrate its 250th birthday. Cheers, #CLT250!

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Endya Perry, a manager at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina, says it's important to find a healthy balance between work and family.

A 26-year-old man died Sunday when the motorcycle he was driving crashed with a car in west Charlotte.

CMPD identified the victim as Joseph Michael Billings.

According to initial reports, Billings was riding a 2006 Suzuki GSXR600 eastbound on Mount Holly Road at 5:38 p.m.  At that same time, Jack Lamar Boling, 70, was driving a 2003 Toyota Highlander on the same street going westbound

The two vehicles crashed as the car was turning left onto Belmeade Drive. Paramedics pronounced Billings dead at the scene. Boling and a front-seat passenger in the car were taken to Carolinas Medical Center with minor injuries.

Police said drug and alcohol did not contribute to the crash. Police said the motorcycle was traveling “well above the posted speed limit.”

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Tom Joyner, host of the nationally syndicated Tom Joyner Morning Show, will speak at Livingstone College in Salisbury on Feb. 7, as part of the historically black college’s 140th anniversary celebration.

“The Hardest Working Man in Radio” will serve as the school’s keynote speaker during its Founder’s Day activities. Additionally, the Tom Joyner Foundation selected Livingstone as its School of the Month for February.

“Having Tom Joyner here adds an extra special touch to the occasion as we incorporate School of the Month and our milestone anniversary into the celebration, but particularly because he has chosen to spend part of his last year in radio with us,” said Livingstone President Dr. Jimmy R. Jenkins, Sr.

Joyner first visited the campus in 2007, when he gave the commencement speech at graduation. That year, Livingstone was also selected as February’s School of the Month. According to school officials, the partnership led to $700,000 in student scholarships within seven months.

The media icon — a 1970 graduate of Tuskegee Institute in Alabama, which later became Tuskegee University — is known for his philanthropic efforts in support of historically black colleges and universities.

He established the Tom Joyner Foundation in 1998 with a mission to support HBCUs through scholarships, endowments and capacity-building enhancements. The foundation has raised more than $65 million to help keep students enrolled in HBCUs and has assisted more than 29,000 students, including, most recently, students at Bennett College.

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Joyner has an honorary degree from every HBCU in the continental U.S. and U.S. Virgin Islands.

Event details

Date: Thursday, Feb. 7
Time: 11 a.m.
Location: Varick Auditorium, Livingstone College, 701 W. Monroe St., Salisbury, NC
Cost: Free


Kallan Louis is a writer and consultant for qcitymetro.com. He does a lot, but never feels like he’s doing enough. His life can be described as a Venn Diagram: News media, Black culture and sports. He’s always on TV, but rarely seen.

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Claflin University, an HBCU in Orangeburg, S.C., is leaving the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association (SIAC) to join the CIAA.

The Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association (CIAA) Board of Directors announced the move today.

Claflin does not have a football team but currently offers 10 of the CIAA’s 14 championship sports, including basketball. The move will take effect on July 1, and the Panthers will be eligible for competition starting this fall.

CIAA Commissioner Jacqie McWilliams said Claflin was a good fit for the CIAA based on the school’s location and its athletic programs.

“They will expand our footprint into the South Carolina market, reinforce our commitment to the student-athlete experience and employ strategies that engage alumni and fans within the region to support our mission and vision,” she said in a statement.

Claflin has formally notified SIAC of its departure, the CIAA said in announcing the move.

Claflin is the first addition to the CIAA since Lincoln (PA) University re-joined in 2010 and will become the conference’s 13th member.

Since joining NCAA Division II competition in 2008, Claflin has won championships in volleyball, baseball and softball, and its men’s basketball team recently won the SIAC men’s championship.

Claflin President Dr. Henry N. Tisdale called the move a “win-win.”

“The CIAA aligns with our institutional profile and the proximity of its members to Orangeburg is very attractive for our alumni and supporters,” he said.

Claflin was founded in 1869 and is affiliated with the United Methodist Church. It lists an enrollment of 2,100 students

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The CIAA will soon announce its decision on whether it will keep its popular basketball tournament in Charlotte or join other sports governing bodies in boycotting North Carolina in protest of House Bill 2, according to a national sports website.

UPDATE: CIAA Will Stay In Charlotte For 2017

Attributing its information to CIAA spokeswoman Bri Funte, TheUndefeated.com, which is owned by ESPN, reported Wednesday that conference officials will announce a decision “before the end of the week in Charlotte.”

But in an email response to Qcitymetro, Funte said the report of a press conference this week was “not accurate.”

“The CIAA Board of Directors and Commissioner McWilliams are in ongoing discussions. An official announcement will be provided by the conference if there are any updates,” Funte said in the email.

The website quoted Shaw University President Tashni-Ann Dubroy as saying that CIAA directors are under “immense pressure” to make the right call.

“Not only because they are highly cognizant of what the outcome of this decision will have on CIAA athletes, current students, alumni fan base and coaches,” Dubroy was quoted as saying, “but also on the external community.”

The CIAA has been largely silent as other sports organizations – the NBA, NCAA and ACC included — have announced that they would move coveted events out of North Carolina in protest of HB2, which would, among other things, limit legal protections for transgender individuals in the state.

Earlier this month, the CIAA’s board of directors and Commissioner Jacqie McWilliams released a statement saying conference officials would “continue to discuss and determine how to move forward for the collective interest of our student-athletes and stakeholders and for [the] future of our conference.”

Priority, they said, would be given to providing CIAA student-athletes with “the opportunity to compete, serve, and create impact within their communities and the CIAA footprint.”

Eight of the CIAA’s 12 member schools are in North Carolina, and the conference this year moved its headquarters to Charlotte, which has hosted the popular tournament for six years.

A vote to move the tournament could cost the CIAA and its member schools millions of dollars in lost revenue, the website reported, with estimates as high as $1 million at one school.

“In total, conference schools combined could lose $6 million and possibly more, considering possible deposits lost on venues for scholarship fundraisers for some schools,” the website said.

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Endya Perry, a manager at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina, says it's important to find a healthy balance between work and family.

Over the past 13 years, the CIAA Tournament has generated $325 million in economic impact to the Queen City, according to the Central Intercollegiate Athletics Association.

Last year, the tournament brought in $47.4 million, short of the $50 million mark of past years, despite attendance being down 17 percent, and direct spending down 14 percent from 2016.

But in 2017, many feared Charlotte would lose the popular event and suffer substantial financial consequences due to House Bill 2, enacted in 2016.  The controversial bill prevented transgenders from utilizing the public restrooms of their choice and resulted in major businesses and other sports conferences, such as the ACC and NCAA, pulling their tournament games from the state.

CIAA Commissioner Jacqie McWilliams talks with reporters at Bojangle’s Coliseum, January 25, 2017. (Photo: Glenn H. Burkins for Qcitymetro.com)

Jacqie McWilliams, CIAA Commissioner, told The Undefeated in a 2017 Q&A  how tough it was to decide whether to move the tournament to Virginia or stay in Charlotte.

“We have to be careful as a conference and as a nonprofit … There was a lot of discussion and conversation on how do we come up with a decision that protects the integrity of who we say we are as our mission and vision states but also that we don’t hinder opportunity for our 3,000 student athletes that we support annually,” McWilliams said. “Also, we had to factor that there could be some sponsors that might’ve pulled out if we would have pulled out of North Carolina.”

The CIAA is under contract to play in Charlotte to 2020. Talks begin this summer about whether to renew the tournament’s contract, according to The Charlotte Observer.

The Charlotte Regional Visitors Authority (CRVA) maintains that no other annual tourism event in Charlotte has a larger impact than the CIAA. Even with a decline in attendance last year, the 2017 tournament was the fourth highest economic impact since it arrived in Charlotte in 2006, according to the CIAA.

“During CIAA week, this event creates upwards of 600 jobs, impacts about 10,000 youth and (donates) over 500 shoes and socks to kids – not mention an economic impact that has surpassed over $50 million the last three years,” McWilliams told The Undefeated last year.

With the support of CIAA corporate partners such as Food Lion, Russell Athletic, Nationwide, and Toyota,  the CIAA has generated more than $20 million in scholarship money for its 12 member schools (8 of which are in North Carolina), about $1.5 million annually.


Brittany Price, of Greensboro, N.C.,  is a senior journalism student at N.C. A&T.

Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina

How one working mom finds balance

Endya Perry, a manager at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina, says it's important to find a healthy balance between work and family.

At a June 28 press conference, Livingstone College Athletic Director Lamonte Massie-Sampson (right) introduced Chiante Wester as the school’s new head coach for women’s basketball. (Photo: Livingstone College)

After finishing a 10-20 season that included a 12-game losing streak, the Livingstone College women’s basketball team has a new head coach — Chiante Wester, a former assistant coach at Virginia State University.

Wester was introduced to the Blue Bears family during a Friday press conference on the Salisbury Campus.

During her 13-year tenure at Virginia State, Wester was part of a coaching staff that produced more than 200 wins, including five regular-season division titles, four NCAA appearances and a CIAA Championship.

“We strongly believe this is not only a next-level move for Coach Wester, but for our women’s basketball team,” Athletic Director Lamonte Massie-Sampson said in a statement. “She is ready and eager to excel as a head coach and deliver her own coaching style to our players.”

At Virginia State, Wester worked primarily with the guards. She also directed community relations, outreach projects, and oversaw the team’s academic study hall.

Livingstone President Dr. Jimmy R. Jenkins Sr. praised Wester for her “leadership capabilities and athletic prowess.”

“We have confidence that Coach Wester was the best choice to lead our women’s basketball team,” he said.

In 2013, Wester was selected to attend the NCAA Black Coaches and Administrators Achieving Coaching Excellence (ACE) Program. In 2008, she attended the NCAA Women’s Coaches Academy.

Wester graduated cum laude from Shaw University in 2003, earning her bachelor’s degree in allied health and recreation. In 2010, she received a master’s degree in sports management from Virginia State.

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I made it out to one of the more anticipated Charlotte Hornets home games this season. The Los Angeles Lakers arrived in town on Saturday for their only regular season visit, the first with LeBron James as a Laker. Here are five takeaways worth noting.

The Lake Show didn’t disappoint

I’m not sure if they were trying to impress Michael Jordan, but LeBron James and his teammates put on a show during pregame warm-ups and delivered an All-Star Weekend caliber performance during the game. James and Lonzo Ball both finished with triple-doubles — the first teammates to do it in the same game since Jason Kidd and Vince Carter achieved it as members of the New Jersey Nets in 2007. The Lakers put the game away in the third quarter and cruised to a 128-100 victory.

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Numbers don’t lie

The Hornets resemble their record…about average. Fortunately, that’s likely good enough for a lower seed in the Eastern Conference but probably a first round exit. Will the Hornets try to upgrade its roster before the trade deadline?

The young guys kept the Hornets in the game in the first half

On a night when the majority of the starters struggled — including Kemba Walker who finished with four points — second-year guard Malik Monk and rookie forward Miles Bridges were a spark off the bench. They scored a combined 19 first-half points, cutting the Lakers’ lead to single digits at the end of the second quarter. Maybe it was that MJ motivation.

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Hornets jab at Lakers bandwagon fans

When LeBron comes to town, it’s expected to see opposing fans fill up the arena. There was a good amount of purple and gold No. 23 jerseys inside The Hive. The Hornets had something ready for those “fans” during a timeout in the first quarter.

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Charlotte will miss Stephanie Ready

After 15 years on the Hornets and Bobcats TV broadcasts, Stephanie Ready is moving on to a new job that has yet to be announced. Ready is a trailblazer for women in sports broadcasting. Starting as a sideline reporter in 2004, she became the NBA’s first full-time female game analyst in 2015. In a controversial move, she was put back on the sidelines last season. She shared an emotional goodbye during her last game. 


Kallan Louis is a writer and consultant for qcitymetro.com. He does a lot, but never feels like he’s doing enough. His life can be described as a Venn Diagram: News media, Black culture and sports. He’s always on TV, but rarely seen.

Over the past 13 years, the CIAA Tournament has generated $325 million in economic impact to the Queen City, according to the Central Intercollegiate Athletics Association.

Last year, the tournament brought in $47.4 million, short of the $50 million mark of past years, despite attendance being down 17 percent, and direct spending down 14 percent from 2016.

But in 2017, many feared Charlotte would lose the popular event and suffer substantial financial consequences due to House Bill 2, enacted in 2016.  The controversial bill prevented transgenders from utilizing the public restrooms of their choice and resulted in major businesses and other sports conferences, such as the ACC and NCAA, pulling their tournament games from the state.

CIAA Commissioner Jacqie McWilliams talks with reporters at Bojangle’s Coliseum, January 25, 2017. (Photo: Glenn H. Burkins for Qcitymetro.com)

Jacqie McWilliams, CIAA Commissioner, told The Undefeated in a 2017 Q&A  how tough it was to decide whether to move the tournament to Virginia or stay in Charlotte.

“We have to be careful as a conference and as a nonprofit … There was a lot of discussion and conversation on how do we come up with a decision that protects the integrity of who we say we are as our mission and vision states but also that we don’t hinder opportunity for our 3,000 student athletes that we support annually,” McWilliams said. “Also, we had to factor that there could be some sponsors that might’ve pulled out if we would have pulled out of North Carolina.”

The CIAA is under contract to play in Charlotte to 2020. Talks begin this summer about whether to renew the tournament’s contract, according to The Charlotte Observer.

The Charlotte Regional Visitors Authority (CRVA) maintains that no other annual tourism event in Charlotte has a larger impact than the CIAA. Even with a decline in attendance last year, the 2017 tournament was the fourth highest economic impact since it arrived in Charlotte in 2006, according to the CIAA.

“During CIAA week, this event creates upwards of 600 jobs, impacts about 10,000 youth and (donates) over 500 shoes and socks to kids – not mention an economic impact that has surpassed over $50 million the last three years,” McWilliams told The Undefeated last year.

With the support of CIAA corporate partners such as Food Lion, Russell Athletic, Nationwide, and Toyota,  the CIAA has generated more than $20 million in scholarship money for its 12 member schools (8 of which are in North Carolina), about $1.5 million annually.


Brittany Price, of Greensboro, N.C.,  is a senior journalism student at N.C. A&T.

Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina

How one working mom finds balance

Endya Perry, a manager at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina, says it's important to find a healthy balance between work and family.

“Bout to go f___ some more n_______ in the hood on Tuesday.”

These were words from a social media post written by a white player on Ardrey Kell High School’s boys’ basketball team ahead of the state semifinal game against West Charlotte High. The player was suspended before the game tipped off on Tuesday night.

West Charlotte High pulled away in the second half to win 69-53.

While the win was important because it gets the Lions closer to their goal of capturing a state championship, their fans’ unified show of support sent a message.

Fans and alumni were already tense leading up to the matchup. The North Carolina High School Athletic Association moved the game from West Charlotte to Zebulon B. Vance High School in University City — a larger, neutral location. As the higher-seeded team, the Lions earned the right to host the game on their campus.

Alumni expressed displeasure on social media, and directly to NCHSAA, but then decided to turn it into an opportunity. If they were providing a bigger venue, Lions fans were going to use it.

“We put the word out because we wanted to make sure this felt like a home game,” said Charlotte City Councilman James Mitchell, a West Charlotte graduate who also played on the basketball team. “I’m so proud of the team because they were focused on the game and not all the noise around them.”

Dressed head to toe in maroon and gold, Mitchell and his sister Kim, also a Lion, filed into the gym with the rest of the pride. The home team overwhelmingly outnumbered Ardrey Kell fans.

The line entering the gym stretched well into the parking lot two hours before the game. Getting closer to the doors revealed an unorganized mess. Hundreds never got in. There was an increased police presence on campus.

There was an intense playoff atmosphere inside the gym. Outside, a number of fans caught a glimpse of the game while peeking through windows. There was a shield of support surrounding West Charlotte’s team. Fans showed the boys that they had their back off the court so they could concentrate on the game.

“If you put on that Lions uniform, it’s about basketball. Don’t focus on our anger, put it out on the court,” Mitchell said.

As for the suspended player, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools is continuing its investigation. No criminal charges have been filed at this time.

This was not the first time Ardrey Kell has had to address racism with its students. During a football game in 2017, the entire student section was forced to leave a home game after yelling racial slurs at black children.


Kallan Louis is a writer and consultant for qcitymetro.com. He does a lot, but never feels like he’s doing enough. His life can be described as a Venn Diagram: News media, Black culture and sports. He’s always on TV, but rarely seen.

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The nation’s first African-American athletic conference is back for tournament action in one of its last showings before relocating the event.

The Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association (CIAA) will host its men’s and women’s basketball tournament at Bojangles’ Coliseum and the Spectrum Center, Feb. 25 through March 2. The Queen City has hosted the weeklong tournament since 2006, but in January, CIAA officials announced that the tournament will move to Baltimore for the 2021-2023 seasons.

Along with on-the-court activities, fans from around the country won’t have to look far for off-the-court entertainment. Here is your curated list of things to do during CIAA Tournament Week.

On the court

The single-elimination tournament will begin at Bojangles’ Coliseum on Feb. 25 with a women’s match-up between Shaw University and Elizabeth City State University followed by the men’s faceoff between Johnson C. Smith University and Chowan University.

Games will continue at the Coliseum until competition moves to Spectrum Center Feb. 28. The championship games will tip off at 1 p.m. for the women followed by the men at 4:30 p.m. on Saturday, March 2.

Recording artists Jacquees, Saweetie, Mike Phillips, Bobby V and Porcelan will perform at the Spectrum Center during the men’s and women’s semi-finals and final games on March 1 and 2.

Game tickets are still available with proceeds going toward scholarships benefiting students attending CIAA-member schools.

CIAA bracket schedules for the 2019 men’s and women’s basketball tournament.

Off the court

Tuesday

Charlotte Area Association of Black Journalists Media Mixer, 6:30–8:30 p.m. — Mix and mingle with local journalists and media professionals at Aloft Charlotte Uptown, EpiCentre. Cost: Free for CAABJ members, $10 for non-members

Thursday

CIAA Minority Business & Leadership Symposium, 8 a.m.-2:30 p.m. — Entering its 4th year, the conference features speakers, workshops, resources and networking opportunities for minority- and women-owned businesses. Charlotte Convention Center. Cost: $50 for general public, $40 for students with valid school email, $75 at the door

CIAA Career Expo, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. — Meet with 60+ vendors offering a wide selection of available job opportunities. Charlotte Convention Center. Cost: Free, but pre-registration is encouraged.

Toyota Green Initiative CIAA Volunteer Day, 2–5 p.m. — Join Johnson C. Smith University in revitalizing the school’s Sustainability Village Garden with gardening activities and tree seedling preparation. Cost: Free, but registration is requested.

DJ Cleve’s Old School Skate Party, 9 p.m. — You think you still got it on four wheels? Head out to Kate’s Skating Rink for some old school vibes. Cost: $15 and up

DJ Luke Nasty, 10 p.m. — DJ and rapper Luke Nasty, the High Point native who dropped the 2016 hit “Might Be,” performs live at Bakadi Lounge. Cost: $17 and up

Friday

CIAA Toyota Fan Fest, doors open at 5:30 a.m. — The two-day, family-friendly event kicks off with a live broadcast of “The Tom Joyner Morning Show” from 6–10 a.m., followed by the high school band competition and the Queen City Cheer & Dance Classic Presented by U.Fit. Grammy-winning singer/songwriter Kandi Burruss is the evening’s featured entertainment. All events will be at the Charlotte Convention Center. Cost: Free

Black Food Truck Friday, 4-10 p.m.– Black Business Owners of Charlotte hosts a special CIAA edition of Food Truck Friday at Recess. Cost: Free admission (food not included)

CIAA Stepshow Throwdown, Greeks vs Greeks, doors open at 6 p.m. — Hosted by Wild’N Out’s Darren Brand, the show features teams representing all nine members of the National Pan-Hellenic Council. Charlotte Convention Center. Cost: $30

JEEZY Tournament Party, 9 p.m. — Check out the artist who brought you hits like “Put On” and “Soul Survivor.” Rooftop 210 at EpiCentre. Cost: $25 and up

Saturday

CIAA Toyota Fan Fest, doors open at 8:30 a.m. — Fan Fest continues with CIAA Super Saturday beginning at 9 a.m. Enjoy performances from 11-year-old viral rap sensation That Girl Lay, a CIAA cheerleading exhibition, the Miss CIAA crowning ceremony and more. Fan Fest wraps up with a performance from rapper 2 Chainz. All events will be at the Charlotte Convention Center. Cost: Free

“LaDiDaDi” Day Party, 12-8 p.m. — The 8th annual event takes over South End Station (Oak Room, Slate, American Pub). Cost: $50 and up

The Hillman Day Party, 1-7 p.m. — Centerstage @ NoDa is the place to be for the third edition of this event. Cost: $0-$20

Tournament Takeover featuring Ludacris, 9 p.m. — The rapper/actor hosts the tournament party at Whiskey River at the EpiCentre. Cost: $40 and up

Sunday

I Still Love The 90’s Brunch Party, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. — Close out your tournament weekend with a special CIAA edition of the popular day party. Cost: $10 and up

Henny & Waffles, 1-8 p.m. — Brunch and then turn up at the latest installment of the traveling event. Cost: $0-$40

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How one working mom finds balance

Endya Perry, a manager at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina, says it's important to find a healthy balance between work and family.

In just over two months, sports and culture will collide in Charlotte for the 2019 NBA All-Star Weekend happening Friday, Feb. 15 through Sunday, Feb. 17. While tickets to the All-Star Game may be hard to come by, the NBA has announced a lineup of fan-favorite events with tickets starting at $15.

All-Star Celebrity Game presented by Ruffles

Friday, Feb. 15
7 p.m.
Bojangles’ Coliseum
Get tickets 

We watched Team Clippers beat Team Lakers in the 2018 matchup, thanks to rapper Quavo, who scored 19 points and was named Most Valuable Player. Who will take the trophy this year? Watch some of your favorite celebrities from music, TV and film take the court alongside some of your favorite NBA legends and WNBA players.

MTN DEW ICE Rising Stars

Friday, Feb. 15
9 p.m.
Spectrum Center
Get tickets 

Who’s making it onto this year’s roster of the NBA’s best rookies and sophomores? Once again, players will compete in a U.S. vs. World format. Team World convincingly beat Team USA in last year’s meeting, 155-124.

NBA All-Star Practice & Media Day

Saturday, Feb. 16
Media Day begins at 9:30 a.m.; NBA All-Star Game practice at 12 p.m.
Bojangles’ Coliseum
Get tickets

These two events are combined this year with a portion of sales going to nonprofit journalism organizations. Fans can look on as more than 20 of the league’s biggest stars are interviewed by the media, and then stick around to watch players and coaches practice for Sunday’s game. And because you need content for the ‘gram, there will also be opportunities for photos and autographs.

NBA All-Star at Epicentre

Friday, Feb. 15 through Sunday, Feb. 17
12 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Epicentre
FREE

Throughout the weekend, fans and onlookers can head to Uptown for a free fan fest featuring NBA players, virtual reality demos and more. Put it on your calendar to check out NBA Crossover, a showcase highlighting the intersection of the NBA and pop culture through art, fashion, music, tech and entertainment.

You’ll have to wait until January before details about the 2019 NBA All-Star Game start rolling out. Team captains and starters are scheduled to be announced on Jan. 24. For more information and tickets, visit NBAevents.com.

Will we get another gem like Fergie’s national anthem serenade to kick off the premier event of the weekend? One can only dream!


Katrina Louis is managing editor of qcitymetro.com who can always find something to do in Charlotte. She’s an offline hustler (and has the shirt to prove it) but when online, find her on Instagram and Twitter.

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How one working mom finds balance

Endya Perry, a manager at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina, says it's important to find a healthy balance between work and family.